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07/01/2021

Why is it called a constant velocity joint?

Why is it called a constant velocity joint?

The CV joint’s name comes from its ability to move with your vehicle’s suspension in any direction (if your vehicle hits a pothole or an uneven surface) and still be able to keep the drive wheels moving at a constant velocity. The CV joint is a very special joint: it connects two different rotating shafts.

How does a constant velocity joint work?

The CV joint is able to transmit even levels of torque to the wheels continually no matter what angle it’ in. This means that no matter how many potholes you hit, or if the vehicle is turning, the CV joint will keep the drive wheels moving at a constant velocity.

What is the type of constant velocity joint?

The two most commonly used types of CV joints are the ball-type and tripod-type. In front-wheel drive vehicles, ball-type CV joints are used on the outer side of the drive shafts (outer CV joints), while the tripod-type CV joints are mostly used on the inner side (inner CV joints).